Egypt Nile Cruise – Colossi of Memnon – Temple of Hatshepsut

It’s been a year since my trip to Egypt and I still have lots of photos to upload.

That 5 star nile cruise was definitely the most enjoyable part of the whole trip in Egypt because Cairo is somewhat a let down. 🙂

As much as I’m adventurous at heart, civilisation is still a must for me. It was such a treat to be able to relax in my gorgeous, comfortable cable and enjoy the views and air conditioning after touring in the scorching heat and being chased by locals everywhere.

I was hoping to get some really nice sunrise and sunset photos on the cruise but unfortunately failed. There wasn’t even one morning or night that the sky turned into a lovely red, purple or orange colour due to sunrise or sunset. It was always kind of misty grey. Never the less, I think it’s still pretty dreamy. What do you think?

Sunset on Nile River – Egypt
Egypt Nile cruise

During the Nile cruise, we went to see Colossi of Memnon: and here are some photos:

The tour guide explained something but I forgot the most of it. So I’ve copied and paste some information from wikipedia as a reference guide:

“The Colossi of Memnon are two massive stone statues of the PharaohAmenhotep III, who reigned in Egypt during the Dynasty XVIII. For the past 3,400 years (since 1350 BC), they have stood in the Theban Necropolis, located west of the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor.

The twin statues depict Amenhotep III (fl. 14th century BC) in a seated position, his hands resting on his knees and his gaze facing eastwards (actually ESE in modern bearings) towards the river. Two shorter figures are carved into the front throne alongside his legs: these are his wife Tiye and mother Mutemwiya. The side panels depict the Nile god Hapy.

The statues are made from blocks of quartzite sandstone which was quarried at el-Gabal el-Ahmar (near modern-day Cairo) and transported 675 km (420 mi) overland to Thebes (Luxor).

Including the stone platforms on which they stand – themselves about 4 m (13 ft) – the colossi reach a towering 18 m (60 ft) in height and weigh an estimated 720 tons each. The two figures are about 15 m (50 ft) apart. “

Including the stone platforms on which they stand – themselves about 4 m (13 ft) – the colossi reach a towering 18 m (60 ft) in height and weigh an estimated 720 tons each. The two figures are about 15 m (50 ft) apart. “

-Wikipedia

After the Colossi of Memnon, we visited Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut:


Copying the Angry Bird:)

This temple is noticeably different from any other ancient temples in Egypt and the owner of it was also legendary. Hatshepsut was a confirmed female pharaoh whose reign was long and prosperous.

Hatshepsut’s temple is considered the closest Egypt came to classical architecture. And there’s more information about it:

“Hatshepsut’s temple employs a lengthy, colonnaded terrace that deviates from the centralised structure of Mentuhotep’s model . There are three layered terraces reaching 29.5 metres (97 ft) tall. Each story is articulated by a double colonnade of square piers, with the exception of the northwest corner of the central terrace, which employs proto-Doric columns to house the chapel. These terraces are connected by long ramps which were once surrounded by gardens with foreign plants including frankincense and myrrh trees. The temple incorporates pylons, courts, hypostyle, sun court, chapel and sanctuary.”

-Wikipedia

You might have seen the Horus statues in this post about the Tempe of Edfu. But look, Horus also made an appearance here in Hatshepsut’s temple:)

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut
Copying the Angry Bird again


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